Richard E. Fowlks, Attorney at Law

Keep this in mind when negotiating alimony

Society is changing, and you may have noticed that women are increasingly earning more than their spouses. Men are becoming more active caregivers, too. While the tides are certainly shifting, the reality is still that many husbands are the primary breadwinners in their families. If this is the case for your family, then you may already know that you will have to pay alimony after your divorce.

The prospect of paying alimony may seem overwhelming. After all, you do not have much control over what a judge decides is the most appropriate amount. But did you know that you may not have to leave this decision up to a judge? Instead, you could negotiate your own alimony payments. Here are a few things you should keep in mind when heading to negotiations.

Short-term alimony can cost more.

So, you do not want to end up paying alimony for the next 20 years, which is understandable. The idea of forking over a lump sum or agreeing to short-term but high-cost payments looks like a better option for you. You can get the whole thing over with quickly and move on with your life, except you will probably end up paying far more than if you opt for long-term, lower-cost payments.

In the case of long-term payments, you are more likely to encounter situations where it is appropriate to terminate alimony. This requires a bit of foresight, and you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse should make the grounds for termination explicitly clear in writing. Common grounds for termination include when the recipient:

  • Cohabitates
  • Remarries
  • Receives other financial support

Is it okay if I don't disclose all of my finances?

When some people realize that they will have to pay alimony, they try to reduce their personal finances by going on shopping sprees or even hiding money. These individuals wrongly believe that doing so will make it look as if their financial situation is not exactly secure, which will lead to lower payments.

However, alimony is usually determined by a person's income and not his or her personal assets. This means that, if you spend your money in an effort to lower alimony, you will still end up paying the same amount, and you will be shorter on cash overall. Any credibility you may have had will also disappear. This can make moving forward with negotiations difficult, and you may have to move on to court.

Alimony is not a bad thing

News stories, celebrities and even your friends might vilify alimony, but it is an important part of Oregon family law. Both you and your ex deserve a sense of financial stability after divorce. If you earned more, or your ex-spouse even left the workforce to care for your children, it might be hard for him or her to find that solid footing.

Still, you should be certain that you are paying the correct amount. This means that you should not be paying either too much or too little. You may be unsure of how to figure this out if you are trying to negotiate alimony with your ex. In these situations, you could consider speaking with an experienced attorney, who can provide knowledgeable guidance throughout the process.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Tell Us How We Can Help

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Office location

Richard E. Fowlks, Attorney at Law
1607 N.E. 41st Avenue
Portland, OR 97232

Toll Free: 888-779-8837
Phone: 503-505-7941
Fax: 503-249-8500
Portland Law Office Map